Designing a Sustainable Future
Deuterium Fuel Source
Sorlox cores use deuterium, which is a stable, naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen that contains one proton and one neutron.  The oceans contain a huge amount of deuterium, about 156 parts per million relative to hydrogen.  There are several ways to extract deuterium from water, including chemical processing, vacuum distillation and electrolysis.

The Girdler sulfide process is an industrial production method for isotopic exchange between H2S and H2O that concentrates deuterium in water over several steps.  Each step consists of two sieve tray columns.  One column is maintained near room temperature and called the cold tower, while the other column is kept at about 130 °C (266 °F) and called the hot tower  H2S gas circulates in a closed loop between the cold and hot tower.  Purified water is fed to the cold tower where deuterium migrates from the hydrogen sulfide gas to the liquid water.  This heavier water then flows down from the cold tower to the hot tower, where deuterium transfer again takes place, this time from the heavier water up to hydrogen sulfide gas. A cascade setup repeats these steps to further concentrate the deuterium, followed by vacuum distillation and electrolysis to refine nearly pure deuterium gas.

After bottling, deuterium can be purchased at a local gas supply company.
The Sorlox Deuterium Cell (SDC) uses deuterium as the fuel source, which is a stable, naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen that contains one proton and one neutron. The oceans contain a huge amount of deuterium, about 156 parts per million relative to hydrogen. There are several ways to extract deuterium from water, including chemical processing, vacuum distillation and electrolysis.

The Girdler sulfide process is an industrial production method for isotopic exchange between H2S and H2O that concentrates deuterium in water over several steps. Each step consists of two sieve tray columns. One column is maintained near room temperature and called the cold tower, while the other column is kept at about 130 °C (266 °F) and called the hot tower H2S gas circulates in a closed loop between the cold and hot tower. Purified water is fed to the cold tower where deuterium migrates from the hydrogen sulfide gas to the liquid water. This heavier water then flows down from the cold tower to the hot tower, where deuterium transfer again takes place, this time from the heavier water up to hydrogen sulfide gas. A cascade setup repeats these steps to further concentrate the deuterium, followed by vacuum distillation and electrolysis to refine nearly pure deuterium gas.

After bottling, deuterium can be purchased at a local gas supply company.